Rowing with Raymond

Because rowing is a passion

2 notes

Rowers should be able to spot what I ‘forgot’ :-) Can you find it?

In answer to Colinfld:
It´s a local model from here in the Netherlands. It´s a wide open boat for two rowers and a coxswain. Used for touring and open water.

Rowers should be able to spot what I ‘forgot’ :-) Can you find it?

In answer to Colinfld:

It´s a local model from here in the Netherlands. It´s a wide open boat for two rowers and a coxswain. Used for touring and open water.

Filed under Lorenzo Xavier Roeien Rowing Rudern

2 notes

11-08-2012 Onésimus in my Cronos
Onésimus took my old wooden skiff out for a bit of rowing today. It needs to get wet every now and then to keep it watertight. Else the wood dries and shrinks a little creating gaps. Excellent opportunity for a photo.I restored the Cronos a few years ago as a learning project for wood repairs. It was not much more than a wreck, many broken parts, woodrot, holes. It was about to be dumped. I spent three years rebuilding all the insides, there’s an intricate wooden skeleton inside giving the boat strength. Replacing boards that were rotted, rebuilding broken and missing parts from scratch (nearly lost a finger finding out about belt sanders and safety). I’m really proud of it.Fun fact: Onésimus, sitting in it in the photo, came up with the new name ‘Cronos’ for this boat. All boats on our rowing club are named after Greek mythological figures, and he thought the god of time was appropriate for the oldest boat in the fleet. From research that I did, this boat was built around 1940-1950, so it is quite old for a wooden skiff.

11-08-2012 Onésimus in my Cronos

Onésimus took my old wooden skiff out for a bit of rowing today. It needs to get wet every now and then to keep it watertight. Else the wood dries and shrinks a little creating gaps. Excellent opportunity for a photo.

I restored the Cronos a few years ago as a learning project for wood repairs. It was not much more than a wreck, many broken parts, woodrot, holes. It was about to be dumped. I spent three years rebuilding all the insides, there’s an intricate wooden skeleton inside giving the boat strength. Replacing boards that were rotted, rebuilding broken and missing parts from scratch (nearly lost a finger finding out about belt sanders and safety). I’m really proud of it.

Fun fact: Onésimus, sitting in it in the photo, came up with the new name ‘Cronos’ for this boat. All boats on our rowing club are named after Greek mythological figures, and he thought the god of time was appropriate for the oldest boat in the fleet. From research that I did, this boat was built around 1940-1950, so it is quite old for a wooden skiff.

Filed under rowing skiff roeien

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